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Research: Cold rice and green bananas reduce the risk of gastrointestinal cancer by 60%

That’s the result scientists draw from a trial spanning more than 20 years, involving nearly 1,000 volunteers from around the world. In this study, they found resistant starch, a type of starch that is particularly likely to help people at high risk for upper gastrointestinal cancers, including esophageal cancer and stomach cancer. and pancreatic cancer.

We found resistant starch reduced the risk of a wide range of cancers by more than 60%. The most obvious effect was observed in diseases involving the upper part of the intestine. John Mathers, lead researcher and a nutritionist at the University of Newcastle, UK said.

Resistant starch in cold rice and green bananas reduces the risk of gastrointestinal cancer by 60%

Resistant starch is a type of starch that passes through the small intestine and then ferments in the large intestine, where it supplies beneficial bacteria to the gut. Many of the benefits of resistant starch have been known in the past, from supporting weight loss and promoting gut health to reducing the risk of diabetes.

The sources of resistant starch are varied, from oats, green bananas, and peas to cooled cooked rice. So, from now on you can start incorporating them into your diet to prevent cancer.

You only need to eat 30 grams of resistant starch, equivalent to one green banana per day

For their study, the scientists performed a double-blind trial on 918 volunteers with a syndrome known as Lynch. Lynch syndrome is caused by inherited mutations in genes that repair DNA during cell replication.

When these genes are faulty, it puts people with Lynch syndrome at increased risk of a wide range of cancers, from colorectal, stomach, endometrial, ovarian, pancreatic, and glandular cancers. prostate, urinary tract, kidney, bile duct, small intestine and brain cancers.

One in 300 people worldwide has Lynch syndrome. So, between 1990 and 2005, scientists at Newcastle University purposely followed nearly 1,000 volunteers with the syndrome to see if there was a way to reduce their lifetime risk of cancer.

Research Cold rice and green bananas reduce the risk of gastrointestinal cancer by 60 | Living

People with Lynch syndrome have an increased risk of a variety of cancers, especially gastrointestinal cancers.

The experiment divided the volunteers into two random groups. A group of 463 people was given a diet containing 30 grams of resistant starch per day, and continued for 2 years.

Meanwhile, the remaining 455 people were given placebos, capsules containing powder that looked like starch but had no activity at all.

Both groups of volunteers were then followed for 10 years. The results showed that out of a group of 463 people who ate resistant starch, only five developed upper gastrointestinal cancer. Meanwhile, the number in the group of 455 people is 21 cases.

“This finding is important because upper gastrointestinal cancers are difficult to diagnose and often go undetected,” Mathers said. By adding resistant starch to the diet every day, just about 30 grams equivalent to 1 green banana has also helped people with Lynch syndrome reduce their cancer risk.

Research Cold rice and green bananas reduce the risk of gastrointestinal cancer by 60 | Living

Eating a green banana every day helps you load 30 grams of resistant starch, thereby preventing cancer.

But where does this effect come from?

The researchers suggest that resistant starch may reduce cancer growth by altering the bacteria’s bile acid metabolism. “This will reduce the bile acids that can damage our DNA, which will eventually cause cancer“, Mathers said.

Cold rice is also a good source of resistant starch

If you can’t eat green bananas, the good news is that there is a source of resistant starch that we all eat every day. That is rice. Tests show that in 100 grams of rice, there are about 7.5 grams of resistant starch.

Thus, you can eat about 400 grams of rice to get 30 grams of resistant starch per day. For those who worry that rice also contains a lot of starch, which can make you fat if you eat too much, scientists have shown a way that can help you cut down on rice and still have enough resistant starch. That is, eat warm cold rice.

Research Cold rice and green bananas reduce the risk of gastrointestinal cancer by 60 | Living

If you let the rice cool in the fridge, the amount of resistant starch in it will increase by up to 60%.

An experiment published in the journal Nature showed that if you cook rice and then put it in the refrigerator (at 4 degrees Celsius) for 24 hours, resistant starch will form in the cold rice. That’s due to a phenomenon known as retrograde degeneration.

During starch quenching, amylose molecules and long branched chains of amylopectin form double helices and lose their ability to bind water. The double helix of the starch molecule resists hydrolysis of amylase in the small intestine. Therefore, it will turn into resistant starch to eventually be fermented in the large intestine.

Measured carefully, the scientists said that if you let the rice cool in the refrigerator, the amount of resistant starch in it will increase by up to 60%. That is, 100 grams of reheated cold rice at this time will contain up to 12 grams of resistant starch. At that time, you only need to eat 250 grams to have enough 30 grams of resistant starch per day.

In addition, you can also add coconut oil to the rice before cooking. This is also known to help increase the amount of resistant starch in the rice.

Research Cold rice and green bananas reduce the risk of gastrointestinal cancer by 60 | Living

Adding coconut oil to rice before cooking helps increase the rate of resistant starch forming.

Aspirin may help reduce colon cancer risk

Going back to the Newcastle University study, although the scientists found resistant starch reduced the risk of upper gastrointestinal cancers, they found no correlation between the two diets and the risk. lower gastrointestinal tract cancer.

In other words, resistant starch does not help reduce bowel cancers such as colon or rectum.

To be clear, this test is also done on people who are genetically predisposed to develop cancer. But scientists will also learn a lot if they learn more about how resistant starch helps patients with Lynch syndrome protect themselves from cancer.

The initial trial was called the CAPP2 study, and the team is now working on a follow-up experiment called CaPP3, this time involving more than 1,800 participants.

And while it may seem daunting, when we can’t use resistant starch to reduce the risk of colorectal cancer, scientists actually have another way.

Research Cold rice and green bananas reduce the risk of gastrointestinal cancer by 60 | Living

The UK’s NICE Institute now recommends aspirin for people at high genetic risk of cancer.

Back in 2020, the same team from Newcastle University also found that taking aspirin, a derivative of salicylic acid, of a class of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs every day could reduce the risk of colon cancer by 50% in women. people with Lynch syndrome.

“Patients with Lynch syndrome are at high risk because they are more likely to develop cancer. So the discovery that aspirin can cut the risk of colon cancer in half and resistant starch reduces the risk for cancer.” with other cancers are extremely important findings“, said Sir John Burns, a geneticist at Newcastle University who co-authored both studies.

Based on our testing, NICE [Viện Y tế và Chăm sóc Xuất sắc Quốc gia của Anh] Aspirin is now recommended for people at high genetic risk of cancer. There’s no doubt that the benefits from aspirin and now more resistant starch are clear.”

The study was published in the Journal of Cancer Prevention Research.

Refer Nature, Sciencealert, Webmd, MedlineplusAuthoritynutrition

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