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Ice melts in the Arctic to reveal the remains of a 10,000-year-old mammoth with intact tendons and skin

Many 10,000-year-old mammoth bones were found by Russian archaeologists from a lake on the Yamal peninsula in late July, according to Reuters.

It is known that archaeologists spent 5 days plowing the alluvial layer of Pechenelava-To Lake in the Yamal peninsula to unearth the mammoth’s bones after it was discovered by local people.

Notably, due to being buried for years under permafrost, the excavated bone fragments have been described as “astonishingly” in well-preserved state. Some parts such as the skull, ribs, and forelegs of the mammoth that lived thousands of years ago retain tendons, skin and even feces.

Ice melts in the Arctic to reveal the remains of a 10 000 year old mammoth with intact tendons and skin | Explore

According to Reuteus, the mammoth was named Tadibe by archaeologists, after the name of a local resident who discovered it. The specimen is believed to be of an adult male between 15 and 20 years old and about 3 m tall, and scientists are currently unable to determine the age of the creature at the time of its death.

Ice melts in the Arctic to reveal the remains of a 10 000 year old mammoth with intact tendons and skin | Explore

The mammoth is thought to have gone extinct about 10,000 years ago. Despite this, scientists believe that the few remaining mammoths may have survived longer in Alaska and on the Russian island of Wrangel, off the coast of Siberia.

Representative of the Shemanovsky Institute in Salekhard (Russia), Ms. Yevgeniya Khozyainova, said finding the complete skeleton of a mammoth is relatively rare. This discovery will help scientists dig deeper into the mammoths and uncover the mystery that led to the massive extinction of the animals that once dominated the tundra for hundreds of thousands of years.

Ice melts in the Arctic to reveal the remains of a 10 000 year old mammoth with intact tendons and skin | Explore

Over time, Russian scientists have found more and more animal bones from prehistoric times in the vast Siberia. Climate change is warming the Arctic region at a faster rate than the rest of the world, revealing the land of some areas that are buried in permafrost.

In 2018, scientists found the bones of a dog from prehistoric times, dating back around 18,000 years old, underneath permafrost in Russia’s Far East. In the past, Russian scientists have found mammoth fossils dating back 30,000 years.

Reuteus reference

[ Æsir Tales ]
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